Feeds:
文章
迴響

Archive for 2010 年 01 月

1st flower ^^

廣告

Read Full Post »

 
 
I have been reading this book recommeded by BBL for several months and finally I will finish it soon! It’s been long I forgot I earned a degree in Economics. Through reading this book, I recalled many stuff I studied in the university and also knew many interesting things I didn’t come across before.
 
The book introduced several great economists in time order and DDY selected below ones who impressed me most (not only their academic contribution):
 
Adam Smith
a. The Wealth of Nations: he wrote it to pass away the time><“‘ The publication of the book brought forth a declaration of independence for economics.
b. Adam Smith, to some extent, was a bit of a bumbler. He usually acted in a absentminded way. We should admit that sometimes wise people are quite absentminded ^^
 
Thomas Robert Malthus
He was called "Doomsday Economist" and he spent many years before he died denying that he was an "enemy" of mankind. He released a frightening theory in the late 18 century that one day output could never keep pace with population growth. Though he missed many important trends in history to make his doomsday eatimation, his logic and ideas still influenced us nowadays like the population control in China and the global environment protection.
 
David Ricardo
DDY likes David Ricardo. He never attended college and never formally studied financial markets, but …"he delved into economic thoery with more competence than any academic." Malthus disagreed with Ricardo, had many debates with him and enjoyed Ricardo’s thoughtful acctacks very much. They were lifelong friends. Ricardo wrote to Malthus before he died: "I should not like you more than I do if you agreed in opinion with me".
 
This future leader of classical economics accidently read "The Wealth of Nations" during a boring vocation when he was 27 years old. He had already been very rich at that time, making a lot of fortune from the stock market, bonds and real estate investments. He contributed to the principle of trade (comparative advantage and free trade), taxing on "economic rent", careful and reasoning method ("literally invented the technique of economics"), etc. He was a wealthy man who could make his life easier and more relaxed. Instead he used his leisure time to study perplexing questions and search for correct solutions. He taught himself about the world and also taught others by newspapes, books and speeches, which wins my respect very much.
 
John Stuart Mill
The sentence DDY remembers very clearly is from James Mill, the father of John Mill. He warned little Mill not to feel proud when he’s sure he knew more than any boys and girls: "Anybody could have done it – given a father like me". John Mill was both the beneficiary and the victim of his father. He was a thinking machine and broke at his twenty years old. After the recovery from spirit disorder, he longed for passion instead of reason and struggled between them. His works taught Alfred Marshall and his position on tax reflected the spirit of the 1986 US Tax Reform Act. Another thing about him DDY also remembers very clearly is that Mill fell in love with a woman called Harriet Taylor. Harriet was married with children. Mill dated with her for 21 years (!) and married with Harriet when Harriet’s ex-husbund died two years later. Mill attributed most of his works to Harriet’s wisdom. He spent his life talking with his father when he was young, talking with Harriet since they knew each other and talking with Harriet’s daughter after Harriet died with his thinking machine.
 
Karl Marx
After knowing more about Karl Marx, DDY reduces her respect for him. Karl Marx spent all his money drinking and made his family live very poorly. He made the maid pregnate and told his wife that Engels was the father (poor Engels).
 
Alfred Marshall
Alfred Marshall was very good at mathematics. He fought for economics as a separate filed apart from history and the moral sciences through his life. He persuaded Cambridge to establish a separate economics course in 1903. He established the marginal tradition that dominates microeconomics today. He taught some of the most prominent 20th century economists, including Keynes. Marshall was said to be a bit "silly" sometimes (大智若愚, DDY is sometimes like that^^). Marshall took Ricardo as his hero (DDY too ^^)
 
Keynes 
Russell once announced that Keynes had "the shapest and clearest" intellect he had ever known. An interesting sentence in the book is "Keynes was smart enough to know that he was smart" (So DDY is not smart since she’s not sure whether she is smart><“‘). Like Marshall, Keynes came to Cambridge to study mathematics but later was encouraged by Marshall to study Economics. Seems that Schumpeter did not like Keynes very much since Keynes was quite arrogant. Except for achievement in ecomonics and investment, Keynes performed very well in the theatre and gain success on his Cambridge Arts Theatre.
 
DDY has another book about dear economists. Will try to finish reading it in Feb.
 
 
 
 

Read Full Post »

Birthday Gifts

 
Thanks so much for so many emails, msn msg, and phone calls with Birthday wishes to DDY^^
 
Thanks BBL for the drawing (Note: DDY does not look that evil or dai dai一線眼)
 
Thanks Bobo for the 暖光 (Bobo: next time, please send a girl card…DDY’s not a boy)
 
 

Read Full Post »

DDY HAPPY BIRTHDAY

 
28周歲^^
 
恭祝呆呆鴨智慧隨年齡一起增加,帶着一顆小孩子的好奇心逆生長:D
 
前些天仔細回顧了我的27歲,發生了很多事情,有很大的變化,謝謝生活所賜予我的,謝謝每一個愛護我的你。
 
雖然每個人對幸福的定義不一樣,雖然說知足常樂有時候聼起來沒有那麽的上進,我還是想說,
 
我很幸福。
 
 
 
 
 

Read Full Post »